PEEKING INTO THE PAST: Lost watch mysteriously returned after 25 years


Peeking into the Past - Judy Minsavage



1989 - 26 Years Ago: Over 60 descendants of the late Leonard and Leona Baiera of Pittston gather on Aug. 27 at Frances Slocum State Park to hold its third annual family reunion. The Baiera, Tuttlimonde, Giamber and Coleman families were in attendance


Sunday Dispatch file photo

Team members from the Nina’s and Hannon’s team help Joe McCullough to his feet after a rough collision at home plate during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs.


Sunday Dispatch file photo

A batter for Jay’s Cafe, Avoca, swings, hoping to hit one over the fence in this action shot taken during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs.


Sunday Dispatch file photo

Stan Waleski, third baseman for Jay’s Cafe, Avoca tags a Quality Beverage player on a slide into third base during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs.


Sunday Dispatch file photo

Did You Know:

“During its heyday the Laurel Line Railroad catered to millions of passengers. Its peak year was 1921 when 4,229,516 passengers were carried. This dropped to 2,849,242 in 1928 after the completion of paved highways between Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. The largest single day was Memorial Day, 1924 when 72,344 were carried at the time the John Mitchell statue was unveiled in Scranton.”

John Mitchell was a United States labor leader and president of the United Mine Workers of America from 1898 to 1908. A statue of Mitchell stands on the grounds of the Lackawanna County Courthouse, Scranton the site of the Coal Strike of 1902. the statue and the courthouse were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

Submitted by Edward S. Miller, for the Happy Birthday American Special Commemorative Bicentennial Edition of the Sunday Dispatch , July 4, 1976.

Question:

Dozens of complaints were received by Pittston police in 1959 leading to a call for action by city council and a renewal of what city ordinance?

1959 – 56 years ago

Approximately 15,600 copies of new telephone directories were distributed to Greater Pittston customers. The numbers reflected a 735 increase in issues distributed over the previous year. The new issues contained 84,760 listings. There were 3,250 businesses listed in the Yellow Pages section.

Min L. Matheson, District Manager of Local 295 of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union of Greater Pittston, placed a full-page advertisement in the Sunday Dispatch thanking and congratulating the people of Greater Pittston “for the warm and continued support of the I.L.G.W.U. in its fight against the disreputable criminal gangster elements attempting to control or disrupt the garment industry.”

In 1959, Pittstonians could call OL4-4656 to have a Roman Taxi Cab transport them to Penneys on Main Street, Pittston where the ladies could buy sweaters for $2.98 and the gents could purchase corduroy slacks for $4.98. Then it was a quick jaunt to California Fruit in West Pittston to purchase tomatoes for 39 cents a half bushel and a gallon of vinegar for 49 cents. After picking out a new Mercury sedan for under $2,800 at Julio Motors on South Main Street, one could stop at Detato’s Market to pick out choice rib steaks at 69 cents a pound.

1969 – 46 years ago

Workmen erected the statue of Christopher Columbus on South Main Street, near the exit from Kennedy Boulevard onto South Main Street. Money for the statue was raised by “Italian-American groups in the city.” The statue, which faces East Columbus Avenue, was sculpted in Italy and stored at the Medico Plant on Route 315 while awaiting ground breaking.

Sadly, in 1944, Mrs. Henry Frederick of Pittston lost a watch her husband had given her as a present. After searching and hoping that the treasured gift would somehow turn up, Frederick gave up on ever seeing the watch again. After many years she admitted she had forgotten about the prized timepiece. Twenty-five years later, in 1969, a mysterious envelope arrived at the Frederick residence. It contained a blank piece of paper which was carefully wrapped around the lost wrist watch. Nothing about the envelope or its contents would give the identity of who had returned it. Unfortunately the watch did not work.

Pittston Area students received a copy of the school’s athletic policy entitled “Code of Good Sportsmanship.” Items listed pertaining to the expected actions of players and spectators at sporting events were, “Treat opponents as guests, respect officials, be courteous toward fellow spectators, cooperate wholeheartedly with cheerleaders, cheer both teams as they come on the field, cheer an injured player, refrain from distracting players, avoid booing and razzing, show self-control, be modest in victory gracious in defeat and consider it a privilege and duty to encourage everyone to live up to the spirit of the rules of fair play and sportsmanship.”

Top 10 songs of 1969:

1. “Raven,” by Glass Prism

2. “Sugar, Sugar,” by Archies

3. “Laughing,” by Guess Who

4. “A Boy Named Sue,” by Johnny Cash

5. “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again,” by Tom Jones

6. “Green River,”by Creedance Clearwater Revival

7. “Easy To Be Hard,” by Three Dog Night

8. “Keem-O-Sabe,” by Electric Indians

9. “Honky Tonk Women,” by The Rolling Stones

10. “Birthday,” by Underground Sunshine

1979 – 36 years ago

Four-year-old Michael Nocera of West Pittston attained his musical talents from his father, Michael Jr., his grandfather Michael Sr., his mother, Marie Arcarese Nocera and her father Phillip. Drums were little Michael’s specialty on which he performed in his dad’s band, the Joe Landon Group. The Kryger Brothers Orchestra, a popular polka band, invited Michael to perform with them on their local television show, Polka Joyland.

Charlene Grabosky of Pittston was chosen to reign as Miss Red Ridge Lake Campground in a contest held at Zion Grove. Grabosky was expected to compete for the title of Miss Pennsylvania Camping 1980 that was to be held at Knoebel’s Grove in Elysburg. Her duties along with the title would include visits to camping shows throughout the year.

It was playoff time in the Greater Pittston Slow pitch League. To see some great photos of team members from Art’s, Jay’s Cafe, Nina’s Pizza and Hannon’s Bar in Avoca during some pretty hard-hitting plays, log on to psdispatch.com and click on Peeking into the Past.

Answer:

A renewal of the “no loitering ordinance” was being considered by Pittston City council members due to “snide remarks” from “young men” directed at the city women during evening hours. The “lads” who congregated on South Main Street were accused of “throwing nasty jibes at females” mostly on weekend nights. The ladies of Pittston were finding the comments objectionable and feared for their safety.

1989 – 26 Years Ago: Over 60 descendants of the late Leonard and Leona Baiera of Pittston gather on Aug. 27 at Frances Slocum State Park to hold its third annual family reunion. The Baiera, Tuttlimonde, Giamber and Coleman families were in attendance
http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_BAIERA-REUNION_0001.jpg1989 – 26 Years Ago: Over 60 descendants of the late Leonard and Leona Baiera of Pittston gather on Aug. 27 at Frances Slocum State Park to hold its third annual family reunion. The Baiera, Tuttlimonde, Giamber and Coleman families were in attendance Sunday Dispatch file photo

Team members from the Nina’s and Hannon’s team help Joe McCullough to his feet after a rough collision at home plate during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs.
http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_GP-PITCH-PLAYOFF-MCCOLLOUGH-1979.jpgTeam members from the Nina’s and Hannon’s team help Joe McCullough to his feet after a rough collision at home plate during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs. Sunday Dispatch file photo

A batter for Jay’s Cafe, Avoca, swings, hoping to hit one over the fence in this action shot taken during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs.
http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_GP-PLAYOFF-JAYS-CAFE-1979.jpgA batter for Jay’s Cafe, Avoca, swings, hoping to hit one over the fence in this action shot taken during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs. Sunday Dispatch file photo

Stan Waleski, third baseman for Jay’s Cafe, Avoca tags a Quality Beverage player on a slide into third base during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs.
http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_GP-PLAYOFF-WAKESKI-1979.jpgStan Waleski, third baseman for Jay’s Cafe, Avoca tags a Quality Beverage player on a slide into third base during the 1979 Greater Pittston Slow Pitch League playoffs. Sunday Dispatch file photo

http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_Miss-Judy-2.jpgSunday Dispatch file photo

Peeking into the Past

Judy Minsavage

Did You Know:

“During its heyday the Laurel Line Railroad catered to millions of passengers. Its peak year was 1921 when 4,229,516 passengers were carried. This dropped to 2,849,242 in 1928 after the completion of paved highways between Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. The largest single day was Memorial Day, 1924 when 72,344 were carried at the time the John Mitchell statue was unveiled in Scranton.”

John Mitchell was a United States labor leader and president of the United Mine Workers of America from 1898 to 1908. A statue of Mitchell stands on the grounds of the Lackawanna County Courthouse, Scranton the site of the Coal Strike of 1902. the statue and the courthouse were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

Submitted by Edward S. Miller, for the Happy Birthday American Special Commemorative Bicentennial Edition of the Sunday Dispatch , July 4, 1976.

Reach Judy Minsavage at 570-991-6403 or on Twitter @JudithMinsavage

Reach Judy Minsavage at 570-991-6403 or on Twitter @JudithMinsavage

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