PEEKING INTO THE PAST: What was playing at the American Theatre in Nov. 1968?


Peeking into the Past - Judy Minsavage



Mark Farrell of West Wyoming wasn’t telling a fish story. In 1978, in less than three hours, he along with his uncles Chet Innamorati and Tom Meighan reeled in 15 Coho salmon at a total weight of over 370 pounds in Pulaskie, NY. Here’s the photo to prove it. Pulaskie is located on the Salmon River, a tributary of Lake Ontario. In 2015, the world-record Coho salmon weighed in at 33 lbs. 4 oz. According to the Pacific States Fisheries Commission, The Coho salmon was introduced from Pacific waters into the Great Lakes and is now abundant there.


Sunday Dispatch file photo

The Blue Girls Cheerleading Squad for the Duryea Wildcats football team. Pictured in this 1978 photo are B. Fahey, N. Ghigarelli, B. Langan, L. Biscontini, K. Dushko, J. Gromelski, M. Langan, S. Lazevnick, K. Leonard, T. Luder, S. Rowlands, S. Sepelyak, K. Shinert, D. Stull E. Van Luvender, W. Vogel, C. Webb. Leaders were Lois Van Ness (absent from photo) and Emma Fahey.


Sunday Dispatch file photo


Recommended


    Erie Railroad v. Tompkins - 1938

    On July 27, 1934, at 2:30 in the morning, Harry Tompkins of Hughestown walked down a much used dirt path that wound along the Erie Railroad Tracks in Hughestown. Nearing the Hughes and Rock Street crossing Tompkins heard an oncoming train gaining on him from behind. He’d walked the path many times so he did not feel any imminent danger until something protruding from the train hit the right side of his head and shoulder and knocked him to the ground, his right arm was amputated by the train wheels. Tompkins sued the Erie Railroad for $100,000, but the lawsuit resulted in a 1938 landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that netted him only $30,000 due to the point of jurisdictional law as to whether Tompkins was a trespasser or the railroad was negligent.

    1948 – 67 years ago

    John Kehoe Jr., of Pittston, chairman of the area’s Old Boys Alumni Association of the Manlius Military School, welcomed the school’s flying committee at the Avoca Airport. The first of its kind, the school’s flying committee converted a military DC-3 in order to visit cities in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Michigan and New York to confer with representatives of the alumni association regarding a new scholarship system and development program for the school. Kehoe a graduate and honor student of the school, was in favor of the new initiatives in order to boost the school’s attendance. The Manlius Old Boys, served in World War I, World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

    1958 – 57 years ago

    Prospect Iron Works of West Pittston shipped their first load of structural steel commissioned by the U.S. Government. The shipment was trucked to Baltimore, Maryland where it was loaded aboard a ship destined for the Azore Islands off the coast of Portugal. In the 1950s the U.S. expanded its presence in Western Europe. Small airfields such as Lajes in the Azores were expanded and used as a mid-Atlantic refueling station. Along with site facilities, housing and community centers were constructed. A liquid fuel bulk storage facility was completed in 1958.

    Christmas shoppers were expecting to take advantage of a 150-car parking lot that would be made available after the demolition of the Howell and King Brewery at the rear of Cron Street in Pittston. the three story building stood on property owned by Medico Realty and scheduled to be leased to the Pittston parking association. The brewery survived prohibition, but could not survive the Great Depression and closed in 1939.

    1968 – 47 years ago

    Offering its students classroom studies as well as real world lessons regarding marketing, merchandising and management, Wyoming Area School District touted its membership in the Distributive Education program. The program overseen by Wyoming Area counselor George Davenport was established in 1967. The training program allowed students to attend scholastic studies in the morning and work at local firms as trainee-employees later in the day. DECA was incorporated in 1963, and by 1969 had associations in all 50 states. Today DECA has 215,000 members world-wide.

    Pittston and Wyoming Area basketball teams accepted offers to participate in the Wilkes-Barre Invitational Basketball Tournament. Wyoming Area participated for two years prior but it was the first appearance that Pittston Area would be making in the two-day event.

    Marie’s Hair Fashions on North Main Street advertised a Thanksgiving special Cold Wave for $6.50. Grablick’s Dairy in Pittston and West Pittston was offering pumpkin pie ice cream. The Arden Villager in West Pittston had holiday dresses for $3.50 to $7.50. The Rosedale advertised mink-collared all wool women’s coats for $69.95. the American Theatre had evening showings of “West Side Story” and “Barbarella” with Dave Clark 5’s “Having a Wild Weekend” playing on Saturday afternoon. A three-bedroom townhouse at Oakwood Park was selling for $19,900.

    1978 – 37 years ago

    Forty-three athletes vied for top weight lifting honors at Pittston Area High School. Awards were presented to Ken Granahan, first place unlimited; Frank Burton, first place, heavy weight; Kenton Roberts, first place middle weight; Bob Avvisato, first place lightweight. Both male and female students participated in the newly added weight training and slimnastics courses.

    1988 – 27 years ago

    Meals on Wheels of Greater Pittston celebrated its 19th year of serving hot meals five days a week to local residents. Those who volunteered their time were Dot Foy, Elizabeth Evans, Marie Lauck, Nancy Poremba, Margaret Southern, Mildred Bainbridge, Jessie Martin, Diane Patrick, Maryann Cipolla, Naomi Carey, Greta Whyte, Charlotte Elias, Gladys Miller, Mrs. Endres, Bill Carey, James Nardone, Joseph Nardone, Carlton Stauffer, Cliff Miller, Ron Merriman, John Foy, Rev. John Dawson, Al Endres, Russ Elias and Merle Bainbridge.

    Mark Farrell of West Wyoming wasn’t telling a fish story. In 1978, in less than three hours, he along with his uncles Chet Innamorati and Tom Meighan reeled in 15 Coho salmon at a total weight of over 370 pounds in Pulaskie, NY. Here’s the photo to prove it. Pulaskie is located on the Salmon River, a tributary of Lake Ontario. In 2015, the world-record Coho salmon weighed in at 33 lbs. 4 oz. According to the Pacific States Fisheries Commission, The Coho salmon was introduced from Pacific waters into the Great Lakes and is now abundant there.
    http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/web1_FISH-STORY-1978.jpgMark Farrell of West Wyoming wasn’t telling a fish story. In 1978, in less than three hours, he along with his uncles Chet Innamorati and Tom Meighan reeled in 15 Coho salmon at a total weight of over 370 pounds in Pulaskie, NY. Here’s the photo to prove it. Pulaskie is located on the Salmon River, a tributary of Lake Ontario. In 2015, the world-record Coho salmon weighed in at 33 lbs. 4 oz. According to the Pacific States Fisheries Commission, The Coho salmon was introduced from Pacific waters into the Great Lakes and is now abundant there. Sunday Dispatch file photo

    The Blue Girls Cheerleading Squad for the Duryea Wildcats football team. Pictured in this 1978 photo are B. Fahey, N. Ghigarelli, B. Langan, L. Biscontini, K. Dushko, J. Gromelski, M. Langan, S. Lazevnick, K. Leonard, T. Luder, S. Rowlands, S. Sepelyak, K. Shinert, D. Stull E. Van Luvender, W. Vogel, C. Webb. Leaders were Lois Van Ness (absent from photo) and Emma Fahey.
    http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/web1_DURYEA-BLUE-GIRLS-1978_0002.jpgThe Blue Girls Cheerleading Squad for the Duryea Wildcats football team. Pictured in this 1978 photo are B. Fahey, N. Ghigarelli, B. Langan, L. Biscontini, K. Dushko, J. Gromelski, M. Langan, S. Lazevnick, K. Leonard, T. Luder, S. Rowlands, S. Sepelyak, K. Shinert, D. Stull E. Van Luvender, W. Vogel, C. Webb. Leaders were Lois Van Ness (absent from photo) and Emma Fahey. Sunday Dispatch file photo

    http://psdispatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/web1_Miss-Judy-21.jpgSunday Dispatch file photo

    Peeking into the Past

    Judy Minsavage

    Erie Railroad v. Tompkins – 1938

    On July 27, 1934, at 2:30 in the morning, Harry Tompkins of Hughestown walked down a much used dirt path that wound along the Erie Railroad Tracks in Hughestown. Nearing the Hughes and Rock Street crossing Tompkins heard an oncoming train gaining on him from behind. He’d walked the path many times so he did not feel any imminent danger until something protruding from the train hit the right side of his head and shoulder and knocked him to the ground, his right arm was amputated by the train wheels. Tompkins sued the Erie Railroad for $100,000, but the lawsuit resulted in a 1938 landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that netted him only $30,000 due to the point of jurisdictional law as to whether Tompkins was a trespasser or the railroad was negligent.

    Reach Judy Minsavage at 570-991-6403 or on Twitter @JudithMinsavage

    Reach Judy Minsavage at 570-991-6403 or on Twitter @JudithMinsavage

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