Peeking into the Past: Former West Pittston resident Jack Parente confirms origin of fire company name


Peeking into the Past - Judy Minsavage



DISPLAY THE AMERICAN FLAG

With the upcoming July 4 holiday, we’ll post each week rules from the United States Code Title 4 Chapter 1 on the proper way to display the American Flag:

No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if on the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States of America, except during church services conducted by naval chaplains at sea, when the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for the personnel of the Navy. No person shall display the flag of the United Nations or any other national or international flag equal, above, or in a position of superior prominence or honor to, or in place of, the flag of the United States at any place within the United States or any territory or possession thereof.

The flag of the United States of America, when it is displayed with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, should be on the right, the flag’s own right, and its staff should be in front of the staff of the other flag.

The flag of the United States of America should be at the center and at the highest point of the group when a number of flags of states or localities or pennants of societies are grouped and displayed from staffs.

What’s in a Name?

With the knowledge of how the Goodwill Hose Company was named, we asked if anyone knew the origin of the names of the Niagara and Eagle hose companies of Pittston and Black Diamond, Excelsior and Germania hose companies in Duryea. Jack Parente of Springboro, Ohio, called to let us know we were pretty much right on as to how the name of Goodwill Hose Company came about. Parente grew up in the vicinity of Ann and Elm streets in West Pittston and his father, John, was one of the founding members of Goodwill. He recalled the incident that brought about the the establishment of Goodwill. A tremendous fire on Freemont Street could not be reached by the West Pittston Hose Company due an L&W train sitting on the railroad crossing. It was determined that a hose company on the Harding side of the tracks was necessary. The idea was met with some opposition, but the founding members of Goodwill persevered and the company was so named to establish goodwill between the fire companies and the community.

Question:

In 1949, what item did a Pennsylvania state law barred the use of that would require the city to the install additional street lights?

1949 – 67 Years Ago

John C. Kehoe Sr. worked in the mines as a young lad, but by 1949, he ended up owning the very mine he first toiled in. As president and general manager of Kehoe Berge Coal Company, Kehoe announced the acquisition of the Exeter Colliery after it had been closed by Payne Coal Company which left over 500 employees out of work. With the acquisition, Kehoe Berge assumed operation of almost all collieries in what was known as the Lehigh Valley’s Northern Division. Heidelberg Colliery in Dupont being the only exception. The absorption of the Exeter Colliery into the Kehoe Berge operation made the company one of the largest independent coal firms in the Wyoming Valley. The company expected to produce a million commercial tons of coal by 1950. According to the United State Dept. Of Labor, “anthracite coal mine production steadily declined from its peak of 100 million tons in 1917 to 46 million tons in 1950. Thirty-five percent of the coal being mined comes from surface facilities or the reprocessing of culm banks. The fatality rate drops to 1.86 fatalities per million tons of coal mined.” The 1959 Knox Mine Disaster ended deep mining in the northern anthracite fields of Pennsylvania.

1959 – 57 Years Ago

“Did they ever find Bum?” was the question readers must have asked after reading a Sunday Dispatch article detailing the search underway by two city patrolmen Bing Bussacco and Joseph Delaney. The stray dog had “attached” himself to the two officers and for quite some time had accompanied them on their beat. He even spent time at each of the officers’ homes, wandering off from one home and appearing at the other on a regular three-day interval. Delaney expected to see the dog at his door for his weekly visit, but no Bum. The patrolmen started to ask questions throughout the town and found that a man had “abducted” Bum, drove him to the Avoca cemetery, and set him free. But a search found not a clue as to the stray’s whereabouts. The officers asked anyone who saw the dog to call the police department. “He’s hard to describe, just a friendly mongrel who is friendlier with cops than anyone else,” said one officer.

1969 – 47 Years Ago

Ballroom dancer Patti Drost of Dupont was on her way to perform on the Ted Mack Amateur Hour television show in New York. She and her partner Evan Sohm of Staten Island were set to perform the Peabody. It was Drost’s third appearance on the show. The Peabody is said to have been invented by William Frank Peabody, a New York City police chief, and is a variation on the Fox Trot.

The Sunday Dispatch Inquiring Photographer asked, “Do you think the new Kennedy Boulevard has improved traffic conditions in the city?” Sam Lombardo of Pittston answered, “Kennedy Boulevard is the best thing that ever happened to Pittston.” Bill Doran, Pittston police officer, added, “Despite a few drivers going the wrong way on new one-way streets, there was no clog in traffic.” Al Forlenza, Pittston, stated, “It has not only improved traffic conditions but has made the merchants a happier lot.” Kennedy Boulevard was opened to traffic on June 20, 1969.

1979 – 37 Years Ago

Members of the Polish Falcons of Duryea played an “old-fashioned” softball game against some of their friends in Mocanaqua and came out victors. Members of the team were Art Kunigel, Bernie Grzyicki, Richie Chesslock, Bob Moluski, George Nowakowski, Steve Gorman, Herbie Hoover, Bernie Kabachinski, Ed Maopolski, Jerry Joyce. Andy Herinchak, Louie Wycoski, Ted Thompson, Dick Gilroy Gene Busch, Johnny Biscontini, Bernie Ryzner, Ed Piorkowski. Eugene Branas, John Coyne, John Blanchard, Bob Ryzner, Don Kreseski, Joe Butrymowicz, Jerry Chromey, Bill Craig, George Gillow, Gene Guarilia, E.J. Maopolski, Jack Danko, Happy McGlynn.

Answer:

In 1949, a new Pennsylvania state law barred and called for the removal of outdoor advertising beer signs. According to the 1948 Polk Directory, there were 163 saloons in Greater Pittston, and as the Sunday Dispatch reported, “The signs brighten up many formerly foreboding sections, which lack proper street lighting. The abolishing of the signs in front of taverns may well necessitate installation of additional street lights.”

This Date in History:

1775 — The U.S. Army is founded when the Continental Congress authorizes the muster of troops.

1777 — The Continental Congress authorizes the “stars and stripes” flag for the new United States.

1942 — The Supreme Court rules that requiring students to salute the American flag is unconstitutional.

1949 — The State of Vietnam is formed.

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Peeking into the Past

Judy Minsavage

DISPLAY THE AMERICAN FLAG

With the upcoming July 4 holiday, we’ll post each week rules from the United States Code Title 4 Chapter 1 on the proper way to display the American Flag:

No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if on the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States of America, except during church services conducted by naval chaplains at sea, when the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for the personnel of the Navy. No person shall display the flag of the United Nations or any other national or international flag equal, above, or in a position of superior prominence or honor to, or in place of, the flag of the United States at any place within the United States or any territory or possession thereof.

The flag of the United States of America, when it is displayed with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, should be on the right, the flag’s own right, and its staff should be in front of the staff of the other flag.

The flag of the United States of America should be at the center and at the highest point of the group when a number of flags of states or localities or pennants of societies are grouped and displayed from staffs.

Reach Judy Minsavage at 570-991-6403 or on Twitter @JudithMinsavage

Reach Judy Minsavage at 570-991-6403 or on Twitter @JudithMinsavage

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